Act

All possible synonyms of the word Act as well as its hypernyms, hyponyms, antonyms, derivations, entailments, meronyms, pertainyms, domain members, similar words, verb groups, and so on...

Act

Definition

  • a manifestation of insincerity; "he put on quite an act for her benefit"

Synonyms

  • act

Hypernyms

  • expression, manifestation, reflection, reflexion: expression without words; "tears are an expression of grief"; "the pulse is a reflection of the heart's condition"

Act, routine, number, turn, bit

Definition

  • a short theatrical performance that is part of a longer program; "he did his act three times every evening"; "she had a catchy little routine"; "it was one of the best numbers he ever did"

Synonyms

  • act
  • routine
  • number
  • turn
  • bit

Hypernyms

  • performance, public presentation: a dramatic or musical entertainment; "they listened to ten different performances"; "the play ran for 100 performances"; "the frequent performances of the symphony testify to its popularity"

Hyponyms

  • show-stopper, showstopper, stopper: an act so striking or impressive that the show must be delayed until the audience quiets down

Act

Definition

  • a subdivision of a play or opera or ballet

Synonyms

  • act

Hypernyms

  • dramatic composition, dramatic work: a play for performance on the stage or television or in a movie etc.

Part holonym

  • play, drama, dramatic play: a dramatic work intended for performance by actors on a stage; "he wrote several plays but only one was produced on Broadway"
  • opera: a drama set to music; consists of singing with orchestral accompaniment and an orchestral overture and interludes
  • ballet, concert dance: a theatrical representation of a story that is performed to music by trained dancers

Part metromyms

  • scene: a subdivision of an act of a play; "the first act has three scenes"

Act, deed, human action, human activity

Definition

  • something that people do or cause to happen

Synonyms

  • act
  • deed
  • human action
  • human activity

Hypernyms

  • event: something that happens at a given place and time

Hyponyms

  • action: something done (usually as opposed to something said); "there were stories of murders and other unnatural actions"
  • acquiring, getting: the act of acquiring something; "I envied his talent for acquiring"; "he's much more interested in the getting than in the giving"
  • causing, causation: the act of causing something to happen
  • delivery, obstetrical delivery: the act of delivering a child
  • departure, going, going away, leaving: the act of departing
  • discovery, find, uncovering: the act of discovering something
  • disposal, disposition: the act or means of getting rid of something
  • implementation, effectuation: the act of implementing (providing a practical means for accomplishing something); carrying into effect
  • egress, egression, emergence: the act of coming (or going) out; becoming apparent
  • equalization, equalisation, leveling: the act of making equal or uniform
  • exhumation, disinterment, digging up: the act of digging something out of the ground (especially a corpse) where it has been buried
  • mitzvah, mitsvah: (Judaism) a good deed performed out of religious duty
  • propulsion, actuation: the act of propelling
  • recovery, retrieval: the act of regaining or saving something lost (or in danger of becoming lost)
  • running away: the act of leaving (without permission) the place you are expected to be
  • touch, touching: the act of putting two things together with no space between them; "at his touch the room filled with lights"
  • nonaccomplishment, nonachievement: an act that does not achieve its intended goal
  • leaning: the act of deviating from a vertical position
  • motivation, motivating: the act of motivating; providing incentive
  • assumption: the act of assuming or taking for granted; "your assumption that I would agree was unwarranted"
  • rejection: the act of rejecting something; "his proposals were met with rejection"
  • forfeit, forfeiture, sacrifice: the act of losing or surrendering something as a penalty for a mistake or fault or failure to perform etc.
  • derivation: the act of deriving something or obtaining something from a source or origin
  • activity: any specific behavior; "they avoided all recreational activity"
  • hire: the act of hiring something or someone; "he signed up for a week's car hire"
  • wear, wearing: the act of having on your person as a covering or adornment; "she bought it for everyday wear"
  • judgment, judgement, assessment: the act of judging or assessing a person or situation or event; "they criticized my judgment of the contestants"
  • production: the act or process of producing something; "Shakespeare's production of poetry was enormous"; "the production of white blood cells"
  • stay: continuing or remaining in a place or state; "they had a nice stay in Paris"; "a lengthy hospital stay"; "a four-month stay in bankruptcy court"
  • residency, residence, abidance: the act of dwelling in a place
  • inactivity: being inactive; being less active
  • hindrance, hinderance, interference: the act of hindering or obstructing or impeding
  • stop, stoppage: the act of stopping something; "the third baseman made some remarkable stops"; "his stoppage of the flow resulted in a flood"
  • group action: action taken by a group of people
  • distribution: the act of distributing or spreading or apportioning
  • legitimation: the act of rendering a person legitimate; "he has filial rights because he obtained letters of legitimation from the king"; "his parents' subsequent marriage resulted in his legitimation"
  • waste, permissive waste: (law) reduction in the value of an estate caused by act or neglect
  • proclamation, promulgation: the formal act of proclaiming; giving public notice; "his promulgation of the policy proved to be premature"
  • communication, communicating: the activity of communicating; the activity of conveying information; "they could not act without official communication from Moscow"
  • speech act: the use of language to perform some act

Act, enactment

Definition

  • a legal document codifying the result of deliberations of a committee or society or legislative body

Synonyms

  • act
  • enactment

Hypernyms

  • legal document, legal instrument, official document, instrument: (law) a document that states some contractual relationship or grants some right

Topic domains

  • law, jurisprudence: the collection of rules imposed by authority; "civilization presupposes respect for the law"; "the great problem for jurisprudence to allow freedom while enforcing order"

Hyponyms

  • nullity: something that is null (especially an enactment that has no legal validity)
  • decree, edict, fiat, order, rescript: a legally binding command or decision entered on the court record (as if issued by a court or judge); "a friend in New Mexico said that the order caused no trouble out there"
  • legislative act, statute: an act passed by a legislative body

Act, play, roleplay, playact

Definition

  • perform on a stage or theater; "She acts in this play"; "He acted in `Julius Caesar'"; "I played in `A Christmas Carol'"

Synonyms

  • act
  • play
  • roleplay
  • playact

Verb groups

  • play: perform on a certain location; "The prodigy played Carnegie Hall at the age of 16"; "She has been playing on Broadway for years"
  • play: be performed or presented for public viewing; "What's playing in the local movie theater?"; "`Cats' has been playing on Broadway for many years"
  • act, play, represent: play a role or part; "Gielgud played Hamlet"; "She wants to act Lady Macbeth, but she is too young for the role"; "She played the servant to her husband's master"
  • act: be suitable for theatrical performance; "This scene acts well"

Hypernyms

  • perform: give a performance (of something); "Horowitz is performing at Carnegie Hall tonight"; "We performed a popular Gilbert and Sullivan opera"

Topic domains

  • dramaturgy, dramatic art, dramatics, theater, theatre: the art of writing and producing plays

Hyponyms

  • stooge: act as the stooge; "His role was to stooge for the popular comedian"
  • mime, pantomime: act out without words but with gestures and bodily movements only; "The acting students mimed eating an apple"
  • overact, ham it up, ham, overplay: exaggerate one's acting
  • underact, underplay: act (a role) with great restraint

Dissemble, pretend, act

Definition

  • behave unnaturally or affectedly; "She's just acting"

Synonyms

  • dissemble
  • pretend
  • act

Verb groups

  • act, behave, do: behave in a certain manner; show a certain behavior; conduct or comport oneself; "You should act like an adult"; "Don't behave like a fool"; "What makes her do this way?"; "The dog acts ferocious, but he is really afraid of people"

Hyponyms

  • simulate, assume, sham, feign: make a pretence of; "She assumed indifference, even though she was seething with anger"; "he feigned sleep"

Act

Definition

  • be engaged in an activity, often for no particular purpose other than pleasure

Synonyms

  • act

Hyponyms

  • play: be at play; be engaged in playful activity; amuse oneself in a way characteristic of children; "The kids were playing outside all day"; "I used to play with trucks as a little girl"
  • drive around: drive without any particular aim; "we were driving around in the countryside on a fine Sunday morning"
  • walk around: walk randomly; "We were walking around in the neighborhood to see whether we could find an open drugstore"

Work, act

Definition

  • have an effect or outcome; often the one desired or expected; "The voting process doesn't work as well as people thought"; "How does your idea work in practice?"; "This method doesn't work"; "The breaks of my new car act quickly"; "The medicine works only if you take it with a lot of water"

Synonyms

  • work
  • act

Verb groups

  • bring, work, play, wreak, make for: cause to happen or to occur as a consequence; "I cannot work a miracle"; "wreak havoc"; "bring comments"; "play a joke"; "The rain brought relief to the drought-stricken area"

Hypernyms

  • succeed, win, come through, bring home the bacon, deliver the goods: attain success or reach a desired goal; "The enterprise succeeded"; "We succeeded in getting tickets to the show"; "she struggled to overcome her handicap and won"

Act

Definition

  • be suitable for theatrical performance; "This scene acts well"

Synonyms

  • act

Verb groups

  • act, play, roleplay, playact: perform on a stage or theater; "She acts in this play"; "He acted in `Julius Caesar'"; "I played in `A Christmas Carol'"

Hypernyms

  • be: have the quality of being; (copula, used with an adjective or a predicate noun); "John is rich"; "This is not a good answer"

Act, play, act as

Definition

  • pretend to have certain qualities or state of mind; "He acted the idiot"; "She plays deaf when the news are bad"

Synonyms

  • act
  • play
  • act as

Hypernyms

  • act, behave, do: behave in a certain manner; show a certain behavior; conduct or comport oneself; "You should act like an adult"; "Don't behave like a fool"; "What makes her do this way?"; "The dog acts ferocious, but he is really afraid of people"

Verb groups

  • act, behave, do: behave in a certain manner; show a certain behavior; conduct or comport oneself; "You should act like an adult"; "Don't behave like a fool"; "What makes her do this way?"; "The dog acts ferocious, but he is really afraid of people"
  • act, play, represent: play a role or part; "Gielgud played Hamlet"; "She wants to act Lady Macbeth, but she is too young for the role"; "She played the servant to her husband's master"

Act

Definition

  • discharge one's duties; "She acts as the chair"; "In what capacity are you acting?"

Synonyms

  • act

Hypernyms

  • serve: do duty or hold offices; serve in a specific function; "He served as head of the department for three years"; "She served in Congress for two terms"

Hyponyms

  • criticize, criticise: act as a critic; "Those who criticize others often are not perfect, either"
  • bank: act as the banker in a game or in gambling

Act, play, represent

Definition

  • play a role or part; "Gielgud played Hamlet"; "She wants to act Lady Macbeth, but she is too young for the role"; "She played the servant to her husband's master"

Synonyms

  • act
  • play
  • represent

Verb groups

  • act, play, act as: pretend to have certain qualities or state of mind; "He acted the idiot"; "She plays deaf when the news are bad"
  • play: pretend to be somebody in the framework of a game or playful activity; "Let's play like I am mommy"; "Play cowboy and Indians"
  • act, play, roleplay, playact: perform on a stage or theater; "She acts in this play"; "He acted in `Julius Caesar'"; "I played in `A Christmas Carol'"

Hypernyms

  • re-create: create anew; "Re-create the boom of the West on a small scale"

Topic domains

  • performing arts: arts or skills that require public performance

Hyponyms

  • make, pretend, make believe: represent fictitiously, as in a play, or pretend to be or act like; "She makes like an actress"
  • support: play a subordinate role to (another performer); "Olivier supported Gielgud beautifully in the second act"
  • enact, reenact, act out: act out; represent or perform as if in a play; "She reenacted what had happened earlier that day"
  • act out: represent an incident, state, or emotion by action, especially on stage; "She could act neurotic anxiety"
  • impersonate, portray: assume or act the character of; "She impersonates Madonna"; "The actor portrays an elderly, lonely man"
  • parody: make a spoof of or make fun of
  • emote: give expression or emotion to, in a stage or movie role

Act, behave, do

Definition

  • behave in a certain manner; show a certain behavior; conduct or comport oneself; "You should act like an adult"; "Don't behave like a fool"; "What makes her do this way?"; "The dog acts ferocious, but he is really afraid of people"

Synonyms

  • act
  • behave
  • do

Verb groups

  • act, play, act as: pretend to have certain qualities or state of mind; "He acted the idiot"; "She plays deaf when the news are bad"
  • dissemble, pretend, act: behave unnaturally or affectedly; "She's just acting"

Hyponyms

  • act involuntarily, act reflexively: act in an uncontrolled manner
  • fall over backwards, bend over backwards: try very hard to please someone; "She falls over backwards when she sees her mother-in-law"
  • presume: take liberties or act with too much confidence
  • vulgarize, vulgarise: act in a vulgar manner; "The drunkard tends to vulgarize"
  • optimize, optimise: act as an optimist and take a sunny view of the world
  • quack: act as a medical quack or a charlatan
  • menace: act in a threatening manner; "A menacing person"
  • make: act in a certain way so as to acquire; "make friends"; "make enemies"
  • swagger, bluster, swash: act in an arrogant, overly self-assured, or conceited manner
  • freeze: suddenly behave coldly and formally; "She froze when she saw her ex-husband"
  • wanton: behave extremely cruelly and brutally
  • romanticize: act in a romantic way
  • sentimentalise, sentimentalize, sentimentize, sentimentise: act in a sentimental way or indulge in sentimental thoughts or expression
  • bungle: spoil by behaving clumsily or foolishly; "I bungled it!"
  • play, toy: engage in an activity as if it were a game rather than take it seriously; "They played games on their opponents"; "play the stock market"; "play with her feelings"; "toy with an idea"
  • act, play, act as: pretend to have certain qualities or state of mind; "He acted the idiot"; "She plays deaf when the news are bad"
  • stooge: act as a stooge, in a compliant or subordinate manner; "He stooged for the flamboyant Senator"
  • joke, jest: act in a funny or teasing way
  • piffle: act in a trivial or ineffective way
  • make: behave in a certain way; "make merry"
  • make as if: begin or appear to begin an action; "He made as if to shake my hand"
  • break down, lose it, snap: lose control of one's emotions; "When she heard that she had not passed the exam, she lost it completely"; "When her baby died, she snapped"
  • dally, dawdle: waste time; "Get busy--don't dally!"
  • backslap: display excessive cordiality (towards); "he is always backslapping his colleagues at staff meetings"
  • hugger mugger: act stealthily or secretively
  • sauce: behave saucily or impudently towards
  • footle: act foolishly, as by talking nonsense
  • frivol, trifle: act frivolously
  • swell, puff up: become filled with pride, arrogance, or anger; "The mother was swelling with importance when she spoke of her son"
  • follow: accept and follow the leadership or command or guidance of; "Let's follow our great helmsman!"; "She followed a guru for years"
  • relax, loosen up: become less tense, less formal, or less restrained, and assume a friendlier manner; "our new colleague relaxed when he saw that we were a friendly group"
  • ramp, rage, storm: behave violently, as if in state of a great anger

Act, move

Definition

  • perform an action, or work out or perform (an action); "think before you act"; "We must move quickly"; "The governor should act on the new energy bill"; "The nanny acted quickly by grabbing the toddler and covering him with a wet towel"

Synonyms

  • act
  • move

Hyponyms

  • alternate, take turns: do something in turns; "We take turns on the night shift"
  • finish up, land up, fetch up, end up, wind up, finish: finally be or do something; "He ended up marrying his high school sweetheart"; "he wound up being unemployed and living at home again"
  • rush, hasten, hurry, look sharp, festinate: act or move at high speed; "We have to rush!"; "hurry--it's late!"
  • interrupt, disturb: destroy the peace or tranquility of; "Don't interrupt me when I'm reading"
  • react, respond: show a response or a reaction to something
  • go ahead, plow ahead: proceed (with a plan of action); "He went ahead with the project"
  • attack, aggress: take the initiative and go on the offensive; "The Serbs attacked the village at night"; "The visiting team started to attack"
  • force: do forcibly; exert force; "Don't force it!"
  • create: pursue a creative activity; be engaged in a creative activity; "Don't disturb him--he is creating"
  • come to the fore, step forward, come forward, step up, step to the fore, come out: make oneself visible; take action; "Young people should step to the fore and help their peers"
  • reward, repay, pay back: act or give recompense in recognition of someone's behavior or actions
  • satisfice, satisfise: decide on and pursue a course of action satisfying the minimum requirements to achieve a goal; "optimization requires processes that are more complex than those needed to merely satisfice"
  • maneuver, manoeuver, manoeuvre: act in order to achieve a certain goal; "He maneuvered to get the chairmanship"; "She maneuvered herself into the directorship"
  • dispatch: dispose of rapidly and without delay and efficiently; "He dispatched the task he was assigned"
  • evade: practice evasion; "This man always hesitates and evades"
  • race: to work as fast as possible towards a goal, sometimes in competition with others; "We are racing to find a cure for AIDS"
  • use: habitually do something (use only in the past tense); "She used to call her mother every week but now she calls only occasionally"; "I used to get sick when I ate in that dining hall"; "They used to vacation in the Bahamas"
  • play it by ear: decide on one's actions as one goes along, depending on the situation; "She didn't know what to expect from her new job, so she played it by ear"
  • play: act or have an effect in a specified way or with a specific effect or outcome; "This factor played only a minor part in his decision"; "This development played into her hands"; "I played no role in your dismissal"
  • deal: take action with respect to (someone or something); "How are we going to deal with this problem?"; "The teacher knew how to deal with these lazy students"
  • partner: act as a partner; "Astaire partnered Rogers"
  • exert: make a great effort at a mental or physical task; "exert oneself"
  • egotrip: act in a way that attracts attention; "This teacher always egotrips and the students don't like him"
  • reciprocate: act, feel, or give mutually or in return; "We always invite the neighbors and they never reciprocate!"
  • go, proceed, move: follow a procedure or take a course; "We should go farther in this matter"; "She went through a lot of trouble"; "go about the world in a certain manner"; "Messages must go through diplomatic channels"
  • come close: nearly do something; "She came close to quitting her job"
  • perform: perform a function; "Who will perform the wedding?"
  • make bold, dare, presume: take upon oneself; act presumptuously, without permission; "How dare you call my lawyer?"
  • prosecute, engage, pursue: carry out or participate in an activity; be involved in; "She pursued many activities"; "They engaged in a discussion"
  • act on: regulate one's behavior in accordance with certain information, ideas, or advice; "The Founding Fathers acted on certain moral principles"
  • interact: act together or towards others or with others; "He should interact more with his colleagues"
  • react, oppose: act against or in opposition to; "She reacts negatively to everything I say"
  • take time by the forelock: act quickly and decisively; not let slip an opportunity
  • coact: act together, as of organisms
  • volunteer, offer: agree freely; "She volunteered to drive the old lady home"; "I offered to help with the dishes but the hostess would not hear of it"
  • get around to: do something despite obstacles such as lack of time; "He finally got around to painting the windows"
  • dally, toy, play, flirt: behave carelessly or indifferently; "Play about with a young girl's affection"
  • set about, go about, approach: begin to deal with; "approach a task"; "go about a difficult problem"; "approach a new project"
  • participate, take part: share in something
  • misbehave, misconduct, misdemean: behave badly; "The children misbehaved all morning"
  • condescend, stoop, lower oneself: debase oneself morally, act in an undignified, unworthy, or dishonorable way; "I won't stoop to reading other people's mail"
  • behave, acquit, bear, deport, conduct, comport, carry: behave in a certain manner; "She carried herself well"; "he bore himself with dignity"; "They conducted themselves well during these difficult times"
  • behave, comport: behave well or properly; "The children must learn to behave"
  • try, seek, attempt, essay, assay: make an effort or attempt; "He tried to shake off his fears"; "The infant had essayed a few wobbly steps"; "The police attempted to stop the thief"; "He sought to improve himself"; "She always seeks to do good in the world"
  • woo, court, romance, solicit: make amorous advances towards; "John is courting Mary"
  • court: engage in social activities leading to marriage; "We were courting for over ten years"
  • dare: to be courageous enough to try or do something; "I don't dare call him", "she dares to dress differently from the others"
  • effect: act so as to bring into existence; "effect a change"
  • antagonize, antagonise, counteract: act in opposition to
  • anticipate, foresee, forestall, counter: act in advance of; deal with ahead of time
  • prosecute: conduct a prosecution in a court of law
  • perpetrate, commit, pull: perform an act, usually with a negative connotation; "perpetrate a crime"; "pull a bank robbery"
  • rampage: act violently, recklessly, or destructively
  • cope, get by, make out, make do, contend, grapple, deal, manage: come to terms with; "We got by on just a gallon of gas"; "They made do on half a loaf of bread every day"
  • condescend, deign, descend: do something that one considers to be below one's dignity
  • condescend: behave in a patronizing and condescending manner
  • take care: be careful, prudent, or watchful; "Take care when you cross the street!"
  • lord it over, queen it over, put on airs, act superior: act like the master of; "He is lording it over the students"
  • stampede: act, usually en masse, hurriedly or on an impulse; "Companies will now stampede to release their latest software"
  • make a point, make sure: make a point of doing something; act purposefully and intentionally
  • repeat, take over: do over; "They would like to take it over again"
  • surprise: come upon or take unawares; "She surprised the couple"; "He surprised an interesting scene"
  • sneak: put, bring, or take in a secretive or furtive manner; "sneak a look"; "sneak a cigarette"
  • play: behave in a certain way; "play safe"; "play it safe"; "play fair"
  • take: carry out; "take action"; "take steps"; "take vengeance"
  • guard: take precautions in order to avoid some unwanted consequence; "guard against becoming too friendly with the staff"; "guard against infection"
  • begin, start: begin an event that is implied and limited by the nature or inherent function of the direct object; "begin a cigar"; "She started the soup while it was still hot"; "We started physics in 10th grade"
  • go off half-cocked, go off at half-cock: act prematurely or without reflection or too soon; "she wanted to quit her job but her mother told her not to go off half-cocked"
  • wait, hold off, hold back: wait before acting; "the scientists held off announcing their results until they repeated the experiment"
  • continue, go on, proceed, go along, keep: continue a certain state, condition, or activity; "Keep on working!"; "We continued to work into the night"; "Keep smiling"; "We went on working until well past midnight"
  • do well, had best: act in one's own or everybody's best interest; "You will do well to arrive on time tomorrow!"
  • continue: continue after an interruption; "The demonstration continued after a break for lunch"
  • continue, persist in: do something repeatedly and showing no intention to stop; "We continued our research into the cause of the illness"; "The landlord persists in asking us to move"

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